Students

SUU students! We are a great place to visit in addition to, or as an alternative to the Art Insights weekly speaker series. Although we highly recommend the Art Insights program for its excellent offerings, we love having students visit and experience the work by our 60+ artists.

How do you get into a gallery? Here are some pointers for working with a gallery.

Submitting to a gallery

  1. Visit the gallery website to make sure your work is a good fit with what they feature. Then peruse the website to see if they have a specific procedure and be sure to honor it! If no info is available, call or email asking if they are looking at or accepting new work, and what their preferred process is—and honor it. If they tell you no, don’t send your information anyway. If they say “not right now”, ask if you could send some information at a later date, and their preference for receiving it. You will be many steps ahead of “the rest” if you acknowledge their process and show a respect for it.

  2. If you choose to send something to a gallery, a postcard or short letter is best. Short, sweet. Don’t walk in with a physical portfolio or send a link. Gallerists really don’t have time to look through a book or website links.

  3. In your simple, printed material, include your name, contact information, website and/or social media link as it pertains to your art (see #9 below). Include a few representative photos of your current work. Include medium information and retail price range. Offer to send any additional info if requested. No packets, bulky envelopes. It’s an unnecessary expense, and galleries probably won’t keep it due to space limitations, AND they will feel guilty for not doing so.

  4. Take no for an answer. If it is a gallery you are really interested in, wait, hone your work and try again based on what you have been told.

  5. Mostly it’s not a good idea to just stop by a gallery, but if you decide to do so, prepare for a number of reactions: unpleasant, unfriendly, and unresponsive. You will probably be asked to submit in another way. A gallery will almost never commit to representing you right then and there.

  6. Remember, you are probably VERY talented, but there are thousands of artists out there and being accepted into a gallery can be a very subjective process at times. Again, respect and honor the process!

 

Delivering to your gallery

  1. Come with prices and correct titles, as requested by the gallery. Be careful to distinguish between your price and the “sticker” price, i.e. the price that will be on the tag.

  2. Be sure frames are clean and in good shape. If reusing a frame be sure to touch up any nicks. Clean the glass before delivering. Make sure 3D pieces are dusted and exhibit ready.

  3. If the frame has a lot of problems. Don’t cut corners – reframe it, even if using an inexpensive, but nice frame. It’s sometimes better not to spend hundreds of dollars on framing and special glass, UNLESS your work is in fact considered collectable and would compromise the value and sensitivity of the medium. Otherwise, buyers would often be just has happy not spending extra money on premium framing, preferring to select their own anyway. Make sure pictures are wired properly. Little saw hooks on the back rarely work (unless the piece is very lightweight and small). Not sure? Check with the gallery.

  4. Make sure your 3D piece can stand on a pedestal without being wobbly. Use protective felt if the bottom of the piece might damage furniture. It’s best to resolve all those issues before bring in your work.

  5. In short, pay attention to the underside of your objects and back of your pictures for things sticking out that could damage walls or other surfaces.

  6. Always take pride in the presentation of your work.

  7. Respect the gallery relationship. Once you agree to be represented by a gallery, it comes with some expectations. The gallery will (should) work for and with you, but that is a two way street. Promote that your work is in your gallery. Don’t undercut the gallery by selling “on the side”. Often a client will “shop” a gallery, and then contact the artist directly. If you receive a seemingly random call about your work, always ask where they saw your work. If they answer at one of your galleries, do feel free to have the conversation, but let them know you will bring the work to the gallery and it will be sold through them.

  8. The gallery represents you, and should always do so with the utmost courtesy and respect. They are the face of your art in that venue. Be mindful that not everyone can afford art, and yours might be the only piece they ever purchase. It should be an exhilarating feeling to walk out of a gallery with a chosen art work. If your gallery doesn’t respect that, consider your relationship.

  9. Keep your social media professional. By the same token as #8, you represent the gallery. People WILL look for you on social media, and it could definitely affect a possible sale. Be true to who you are, but think some things through. As with any job, you have to comply with some social expectations.

 

What to know about your gallery

  1. How is pricing determined?

  2. Is there a discount structure?

  3. What is the commission structure?

  4. How and when you will get paid?

SUU students! We are a great place to visit in addition to, or as an alternative to the Art Insights weekly speaker series. Although we highly recommend the Art Insights program for its excellent offerings, we love having students visit and experience the work by our 60+ artists.

Art Works Gallery | 16N 100 W  | Cedar City, UT | 84720 | 503.810.0958 | lindaskiley@gmail.com